No, Atheist Lives Don’t Matter

At first, it seems reprehensible to suggest someone’s life doesn’t matter—but this is an objective fact about atheists. They’ll be the first to tell you that life has no meaning, or some platitude about how we must find our own meaning. Sorry atheists, life does have meaning and serves as much function to God as a brain cell serves to the mind; in this analogy, atheism is cancer.

Atheists are living a meaningless life doomed to suffering.

Many atheists are non-believers because of depression. I am not trying to suggest they ought to kill themselves. Rather, I am pinpointing the source of their suffering. By misidentifying their “Self” with their conscious attention, atheists are quite literally defining themselves with their anxiety. We’ll discuss this and how it relates to original sin in a later post about identity.

As the only known self-aware beings, and this will remain true even after discovering extraterrestrial intelligences, it is clear to most people that we have a special function in the Universe. Atheists, because they misidentify themselves with an illusion, believe consciousness is something contained. Science suggests this is not the case, in fact—our bodies are deterministic machines continuous with the whole causal chain of events. Our will is likewise part of the continuum.

By acknowledging ourselves as the will of the Universe, we fulfill our purpose. Until atheists become liberated from the hallucination of being an individual, they are living a meaningless life doomed to suffering. That is why they need our help.

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9 thoughts on “No, Atheist Lives Don’t Matter

    1. “We are spiritual beings having a human experience.” That is a quote from the late Stephen Covey. But, the concept is very old in eastern religions and philosophies.

      Our souls come from God. When the soul departs the body, of course, the body dies. Atheists are stuck at a bodily level of consciousness. This is largely due to, as the author of this blog mentions, their reductive materialsim.

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      1. Free-will and mind/body. I believe in a causal Universe but I also identify as the will of that Universe, I am not something which is shackled to the causal will of the Universe. I understand the supernatural aspect of consciousness, but dualism doesn’t solve the hard problem. Nor does strict idealism. I believe that matter at its most fundamental level is more like the qualitative aspect of sensation, rather than the monolith impression inferred by our perceptions of the material world.

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    1. I think most discussion of free will simply equivocates on the notions of explicability and predictability. It’s a red herring.
      I have never understood what it would take to make something supernatural.
      To get back to your statements: what do you mean by ‘will’?
      Nobody really wants to solve the hard problem – to say why awareness carries with it a qualitative isolation – they simply hope to neutralize it.
      “I believe that matter at its most fundamental level is more like the qualitative aspect of sensation, rather than the monolith impression inferred by our perceptions of the material world” Do you simply mean to say that there is no noumenal/phenomenal divide?

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